Tag Archives: Charles Olsen

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Charles Olsen reads ‘Inland’ – ‘Tierra adentro’

 

 

nzpoetryshelf-DSCF3056.jpg

 

 


Charles Olsen reads ‘Inland’ – ‘Tierra adentro’ in Spanish – from his bilingual collection Antípodas published in Spain by Huerga & Fierro, 2016.

 

 

Charles Olsen moved to Spain drawn by his interest in Spanish artists such as Velázquez and Goya and to study flamenco guitar. Artist, filmmaker and poet, his paintings have been exhibited in the UK, France, New Zealand and Spain, and he has two bilingual collections of poetry published in Spain, Sr Citizen (Amargord, 2011) and Antípodas (Huerga & Fierro, 2016). His short film The dance of the brushes was awarded second prize in the I Flamenco Short Film Festival in Spain and his poetry films have been shown at international festivals and featured online in Moving Poems, Poetry Film Live and Atticus Review. In 2018 he was awarded the III Antonio Machado Poetry Residency in Segovia and Soria and he has received the XIII distinction Poetas de Otros Mundos.

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf noticeboard: Charles Olsen’s essay in Cordite responds to the Christchurch mosque attacks

On Being Sanguine: Two Years of Panic and a Response to Terror in Christchurch


Self-portrait by Charles Olsen in Wellington, NZ (1991)

One Sunday, when I was an art student in London, I got on my bicycle and left my parents’ vicarage in Surrey for my room in Murray Mews, going along the River Thames and through London’s parks: Bushy Park, Richmond Park, Hyde Park and Regents Park. I was stung by a bee or wasp somewhere around Shepperton which got my blood up and I raced towards the city, perhaps a little too fast for my own good; a reaction to adversity.

*I didn’t know how to respond to the Christchurch shooting. It was so out of the blue. By chance a few days after the attack happened to be the launch in Wellington of a collection of poems by migrant and refugee poets in New Zealand called More of Us from Landing Press. It includes my poem ‘When you least expect’, about a series of terrorist bombings near places I was staying in London, Cairo and Madrid. The most devastating for me was back in 2004 where I live in Madrid, about six months after I’d moved to Spain. A series of explosions on the local train network during the morning rush hour killed 193 people and injured around 2,000. I was on a train heading out of Atocha station as the backpacks containing the bombs were abandoned on packed trains heading towards Atocha. I must have heard one of the explosions in the distance lost in the noise of the train but it was only when I arrived at 8.00am at the company where I gave English classes and found my students huddled around the radio and online, searching for the news, that I learned what had occurred. They were surprised I’d managed to get to work. We didn’t have the class that day and I made my way into Torrejón de Ardoz and found where to catch a bus back into Madrid.

Charles Olsen, 1 May 2019

 

Read the whole piece here

 

‘”I didn’t know how to respond to the Christchurch shooting. It was so out of the blue. By chance a few days after the attack happened to be the launch in Wellington of a collection of poems by migrant and refugee poets in New Zealand called More of Us from Landing Press.”

 

 

 

 

New Zealander Charles Olsen awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado in Spain

Charles Olsen_photo by Lilián Pallares-14-7-2018.jpg

 

Warm congratulations from Poetry Shelf!
New Zealander Charles Olsen has been awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado, which takes the name of the Spanish writer who lived and worked in the cities of Segovia and Soria in Spain.

Organized by the town councils of Segovia and Soria the residency is open to poets resident in Europe of any nationality other than Spanish who have a basic knowledge of the Spanish language. The winner receives 3,000 euros and the town councils cover the poet’s travel costs to and from their cities.

The jury, presided over by Manuel Rico Rego and including Amalia Iglesias, María Isabel Gil, César Ibáñez and Andrés Martín has awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado to Charles Olsen for his proposal, which includes the first draft of a collection of between 30 and 40 poems in Spanish divided in two parts (Segovia and Soria) and a poetry project with the participation of residents of Segovia and Soria.

Charles will spend one month in each city following in the footsteps of the Spanish poet Antonio Machado, who first moved to the region of Castile in 1907 taking up the position of Professor of French at the Instituto General y Técnico of Soria, which now bears his name. He stayed until 1912, the year his young wife, Leonor Izquierdo, died and shortly after the publication of the first edition of Campos de Castilla.

2019 will be the centenary of the Antonio Machado’s arrival in Segovia where he stayed from 1919 until 1932 giving classes at the Instituto General y Técnico—now the IES Mariano Quintanilla—and actively participating in the creation and development of valuable democratic projects such as the Popular University, which will also celebrate its centenary in 2019 and has now become the San Quirce Royal Academy of History and Arts. A convinced pro-European and committed to peace and respect when both were becoming scarce in the world, Antonio Machado continues to be an important humanist and ethical figure, which only adds to the greatness of his literary oeuvre.

Charles himself has published two collections of poetry in Spain, Sr Citizen and Antípodas, and his poems are included in recent editions of Landfall, Poetry New Zealand Yearbook and Blackmail Press.

For New Zealand’s Phantom Billstickers National Poetry Day in August he will be running the competition Given Words, now in its third year, and to celebrate receiving the award he will choose words from one of Antonio Machado’s poems with which participants must weave their own poem. The Given Words competition, open to all New Zealand citizens and residents of any age, will go live on 1 August and has prizes for Best Poem and Best Poem by Under-16s, donated by Massey University Press and Mākaro Press. The winning poems will also be translated into Spanish.

 

 

 

 

Final episode of Poem on a Madrid Terrace

‘It appears the cold weather has finally arrived in Madrid after an extended summer… Anna Borrie and I read ‘You’ by C.K. Stead in the final episode of ‘Poem on the Terrace – New Zealand Poets’, where we introduce kiwi poets to a Spanish-speaking audience.’

Charles Olsen

Screen Shot 2017-11-13 at 8.32.23 AM.png

Listen here

Poetry conversation on a Madrid rooftop – Carolyn McCurdie

Poem on the Terrace – Planting Cabbages de Carolyn McCurdie

‘Poem on the Terrace – poetas neozelandeses’. Una serie para dar a conocer la poesía de las antípodas de España. Los neozelandeses, Charles Olsen y Anna Borrie, recitan y comentan un poema en una agradable terraza de Madrid.

En este capítulo leen ‘Planting Cabbages’ de Carolyn McCurdie. Pueden leer más sobre la autora, y leer su poema en castellano, en Palabras Prestadas.

We present ‘Poem on the Terrace – New Zealand Poets’, where we introduce kiwi poets to a Spanish audience. Charles Olsen and Anna Borrie recite and discuss a poem on a relaxed Madrid roof terrace.

In this chapter they read ‘Planting Cabbages’ by Carolyn McCurdie. Find out more about the author at the Otago Writers Network.

Listen here.
Screen Shot 2017-10-15 at 10.20.33 AM.png
%d bloggers like this: