Category Archives: NZ author

Summer Postcard: min-a-rets,  issue 7, spring 2017

 

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This slim adorably-produced poetry journal is a treat to read and hold (my favourite looking NZ volume – who wouldn’t want a poem in here!). It is rich in voice and edges.

The editor:

Zarah Butcher-McGunnigle has brought min-a-rets to life after a three-year hiatus. She states the original aim was to champion ‘openness & intensity in poetry, with a focus on NZ, but also including a few international writers each time’. She has stuck to the same poetic impulse and she has included some Melbourne poets – she is currently based there.

 

The poets:

Hana Pera Aoake, Eden Bradfield, Owen Connors, Anna Crews, Craig Foltz, Rebecca Nash, Rachel O’Neill, Ursula Robinson Shaw

 

The poems:

I open upon Rachel’s title, ‘The sky is a wide, unmoving chest’, and then fall into a poem that is wide but full of movement, strange and supple. Three poems from Eden catch air in their double spacing, floating talk, the everyday adrift. Ursula’s ‘2 Poems’ also float on the page, but here the talk static intensifies. The fragments startle first as little pieces, and then achieve a stuttering breathfilled momentum.

Voice – the speaking surge and spurt – marks Owen’s ‘4 untitled fragments’. This is not disembodied writing but is flush with sex and disenchantment and living.

 

Highly recommend this. Check out the journal here

Submissions closed for the next issue at the end of January – so look forward to that!

 

 

 

Eileen Myles to judge Sarah Broom Poetry Prize: entries now open

Exciting news! Will be in the queue for this festival session that’s for sure.

 

 

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SARAH BROOM POETRY PRIZE

The Sarah Broom Poetry Prize is one of New Zealand’s most valuable poetry prizes and aims to recognise and financially support new work from an emerging or established New Zealand poet. In 2018, the prize is an award of $5,000.

The prize was established in 2013 in honour of the New Zealand poet Sarah Broom (1972-2013), the author of Tigers at Awhitu (2010) and Gleam (2013).

Entries open on 19 February and close on 11 March 2018

Now in its fifth year, we are pleased to again showcase and celebrate New Zealand poetry during Auckland Writers Festival week in May 2018. Shortlisted poets will read from their work at a dedicated poetry event hosted by the Sarah Broom Poetry Trust where the winner will be announced.

 

 

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For more information about the prize and Sarah Broom visit http://www.sarahbroom.co.nz

For more information about the Auckland Writers Festival, which will be held from 15 – 20 May 2018, visit here

HOW TO ENTER

The prize is awarded on the basis of an original collection of poems by a New Zealand resident or citizen. Entries will be accepted from from 19 February 2018 until 11 March 2018.

Poets are required to submit six to eight poems, of which at least five must be unpublished. The recipient of the prize will be announced in May 2018 during Auckland Writers Festival week. Shortlisted poets will be invited to attend a dedicated event and read from their work.

Entries should be emailed to poetryprize@sarahbroom.co.nz

Any queries should be emailed to enquiries@sarahbroom.co.nz

CONDITIONS OF ENTRY

  1. Poets are required to submit six to eight poems of which at least five must be unpublished.
  2. There is no maximum or minimum length – formatting and font size is your choice.
  3. Entrants must be New Zealand permanent residents or citizens.
  4. Only one entry per person will be accepted.
  5. Entries must be the author’s original work. Any use of quotation must be acknowledged by attribution to its source.
  6. Entries must be submitted as one electronic file per entrant, as an email attachment in Word or PDF format. No identifying details should be present in this poetry portfolio.
  7. Your entry should also include a covering email with a brief personal statement, an indication of how you would use the award money, and contact details. These covering details are not provided to the judge.
  8. The judge will assess the merits of submissions, and the Sarah Broom Poetry Trust reserves the right not to award a prize.
  9. The prize recipient will be announced during Auckland Writers Festival week in May 2018 and in other appropriate publications.
  10. It is expected that entrants would be able to travel to Auckland, if shortlisted, for the Sarah Broom Poetry Prize event which will likely be on either Saturday 19 May or Sunday 20 May 2018. Times and details will be announced on the website http://www.sarahbroom.co.nz
  11. No correspondence with the judge will be entered into.
  12. The name and photograph of the prize recipient may be used by the Sarah Broom Poetry Trust for publicity purposes.

Still a few places in Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat

The 2018 Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat

Immerse yourself in writing and conversation this summer. There’s something for everyone–whether you’re new to writing, an established writer, or somewhere in-between.

Dates: 23-25 February 2018
Location: El Rancho, Kāpiti Coast, New Zealand
Registration:  Register securely online or contact kirsten@kahini.org with any questions or for additional information.

Join us for the Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat and renew and recharge your writing and your life. The Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat is an immersive, two-day gathering for writers, happening on the Kāpiti Coast. The retreat includes intensive morning workshops, lively afternoon discussions and space to write, relax and engage with topics critical to your work. Read about last year’s event here.

Kahini is delighted to host six established New Zealand writers–Airini Beautrais, Anahera Gildea, Pip Adam, Rajorshi Chakraborti, Queenie Rikihana-Hyland and Victor Rodger–at the 2018 Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat. Each writer will teach morning workshops: in fiction, poetry, memoir writing and mixed genre. In the afternoons they will lead discussions on topics pertinent to craft and literature in Aotearoa. (Read descriptions of the workshops, afternoon discussions and teachers below.)Talking

All writers are welcome, at whatever stage you are in your writing life. You’ll find community, encouragement, and a safe place in which to take artistic risks. Please contact Kirsten at kirsten@kahini.org for more information. Register for the Kāpiti Writers’ Retreat!

 

 

programme

Friday, 23 February
5:30 pm: Welcome
7 pm: Barbecue
8:30 pm: Freewrite with Helen Lehndorf (optional)

Saturday, 24 February
7 am: Gentle morning yoga with Helen Lehndorf (optional)
8 am: Breakfast
9 am–12:30 pm: Morning workshop (morning tea break included)
12:30 pm–1:30 pm: Lunch
2 pm–3 pm: Afternoon sessions: Moving at the Speed of Creativity & The Sum and its Parts
3 pm–4 pm: Afternoon sessions: Audio Storytelling & The Litmus Test
4 pm–5 pm: Workshop check-in
5:30 pm: Dinner
8 pm–9 pm: Open mike readings (optional)

Sunday, 25 February
7 am: Gentle morning yoga with Helen Lehndorf (optional)
8 am: Breakfast
9 am–12:30 pm: Morning workshop (morning tea break included)
12:30 pm–1:30 pm: Lunch
2 pm–3 pm: Afternoon sessions: The Poem Sequence & How Do We Tell Our Stories 
3 pm: Closing

Full details here

A 2017 poem toast to you – from Mere Taito’s splendid debut

 

Feed

the sea
gate-crashes your lunch
through an opening
in the bus shelter wall

it salts your chips
makes you squeeze
the tomato sauce out of your words
onto the battered fish

the butcher’s paper
grabs the name of your crush
and coats it with the hot oil
before the wind blows it
through the door of the Metrolink bus
E.R.I.C

(sigh…)
deliriously happy
you mouth feed the seagulls

 

©Mere Taito, The Light and dark in Our Stuff (2017)

 

 

Mere introduces herself at the start of her debut poetry book – a book that I like very much indeed.

‘The island of Rotuma is my ancestral-mapiga (grandmother) home. It looks like a whale on Google Earth. Fiji is my I-grew-up here-home and New Zealand, my right-now home. I moved to New Zealand in 2007 because my father ‘talked up’ this country – he said it was a great country to live in. Except for winter, I have no reason to believe otherwise.’

The book is a book of two halves; five dark poems and five light poems. I have read it twice, sitting on the beach at the end of my run, finding the shift from dark to  light sparking even sharper in a dramatic setting. Mere offers music, challenges, an attentive eye and heart, and it feels like a little guidebook to living. On this particular occasion, in this particular way. Wonderful.

So with this poem, and permission from Mere, a warm seasonal, poetry toast to you all!

xx

A new poem from Joan Fleming: ‘Was the night before’

 

Was the night before

 

[because fast and faster aren’t necessarily

[this lucky and the lights burning her feet like

[angry because people are saying “happy hols” and the jingling

[was the first sign the roast was too long in the

[wondering if burnt feet stay burnt like

[decorations and shoved them onto the coffee table like here

[dry streets don’t you remember how we always

[someone is always closing them again, “it’s the flies”

[her favourite, marshmallows liquefying into the mashed

[a skin on it because we left it too long or

[not the smell that sets the alarms off, it’s the smoke’s

[makes my soul slack out she said, those tunes you want to claw your

[“over here” said the Santa, because where were all the little

[crackling, that’s my favourite part even though my mouth can’t

[if I’m going to do it, I’m not going to do it wearing

[be always telling you shut the

[not the family I thought I

[happens when I lit the pine

[bauble just comes right apart in your hand

 

©Joan Fleming 2017

 

Joan was one of the highlights for me at the recent Poetry & the Essay conference at Victoria University. Her paper raised important questions on borrowing, acknowledging, taking risks, building conversations, processing different ways of doing and being, especially of being white woman alongside aborigine women. Having had a taste of the poems, I can’t wait for a book to emerge. And I just loved listening to her reading.

This poem, however, is a little – as Joan said – slightly prickly toast to Christmas.