Tag Archives: Poetry Shelf Audio Spot

Poetry Shelf Audio Spot: Kiri Piahana-Wong reads ‘So far below’

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Kiri reads ‘So far below’, originally published in Ika No. 4 (2016).

 

 

Kiri Piahana-Wong is a poet and editor, and is the publisher at Anahera Press. Her poems have appeared in over forty journals and anthologies, most recently in tātai whetū: seven Māori women poets in translation, Bonsai: Best small stories from Aotearoa New Zealand, Landfall, and Ora Nui. Kiri lives in central Auckland with her partner and baby son. Her second full collection, Tidelines, is due out next year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Rhian Gallagher reads ‘Into the Blue Light’

 

 

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‘Into the Blue Light’ appeared in Stand Magazine (UK).

 

 

Rhian Gallagher’s first poetry collection Salt Water Creek (Enitharmon Press, 2003) was shortlisted for the Forward Prize for First Collection. She received a Canterbury Community Historian Award in 2007- Feeling for Daylight: the Photographs of Jack Adamson was published by the South Canterbury Museum, 2010. In 2008 she received the Janet Frame Literary Trust Award. Her second collection Shift, (Auckland University Press 2011, Enitharmon Press, UK, 2012) won the 2012 New Zealand Post Book Award for Poetry. Gallagher’s most recent work Freda: Freda Du Faur, Southern Alps, 1909-1913 was produced in collaboration with printer Sarah M. Smith and printmaker Lynn Taylor (Otakou Press 2016). Rhian was awarded the Robert Burns Fellowship in 2018.

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Lynley Edmeades reads ‘The Age of Reason’

 

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Photo credit: Rory Mearns

 

 

Lynley Edmeades’s ‘The Age of Reason’ appeared in Landfall 235 edited by Emma Neale

 

Lynley Edmeades is currently working on her second collection of poems, which explores ideas of listening. Her first book, As the Verb Tenses, was published by Otago University Press in 2016. She is the 2018 Ursula Bethell Writer in Residence at the University of Canterbury and is living in Lyttelton for now.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E Wen Wong’s ‘Whakatū Wāhine’: A poem, a card and we hold hands

 

 

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‘Whakatū Wāhine’ by E Wen Wong

 

E Wen Wong is a Year 11 Student at Burnside High School in Christchurch. E Wen began writing poetry when she was ten years old and was one of the very first fans of Poetry Box. Now, six years later, her poems have made their way into Rattle, Starling and Meniscus journals, among others.

E Wen was an early fan of my blog when I was feeling my way as a blogger. I got to watch her poems develop over the years as she tried my challenges and we exchanged letters. I recognised a passionate writer who was willing to try new things. I met her when she performed in my Hot Spot Poetry Tour in Christchurch and I felt a little sad when she moved on to secondary school (Poetry Box is for Y1 – Y8)! How delighted I was when I discovered her recent poem at Starling, an online literary magazine dedicated to writers under 25.  Last week E Wen sent me a gorgeous card and this ‘Whakatū Wāhine’ to celebrate Suffragette 125. I felt so moved that in this celebratory year we have reached out, in the media and personally,  to acknowledge the women, young and old, who have inspired us, backed us, engaged with and challenged us. Thank you E Wen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Sugar Magnolia Wilson’s ‘Betty as a Boy’

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Sugar Magnolia Wilson is from the Far North of New Zealand and has been living in Wellington for six years. She has recently had work published in Turbine | Kapohau and Landfall. She co-edits Sweet Mammalian, a journal of New Zealand poetry, along with Hannah Mettner and Morgan Bach. Her first full-length collection of poetry, Because a woman’s heart is like a needle at the bottom of the ocean, will be published by AUP in March 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Wen-Juenn Lee’s ‘Prologue’

 

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Prologue‘ appeared in Three Lamps, an online journal from the University of Auckland, edited by Paula Morris.

 

Wen-Juenn Lee edits poetry for the Australian literary journal, Voiceworks. She works and lives in Melbourne, and writes of home and belonging.

 

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Rebecca Hawkes reads ‘Sighting’

 

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Photo credit: Mitchell Botting 

 

 

 

‘Sighting’ was originally published in Starling 5

 

 

Rebecca Hawkes is a poet and painter who has traded the tussock-clad hills of the Canterbury high country for the suburban slopes of Wellington. More of her work can be found in Landfall, Mimicry, Sport, and elsewhere via her website.

 

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