Category Archives: Poetry Awards

31st Annual Ronald Hugh Morrieson Literary Awards results

The 31st Annual Ronald Hugh Morrieson Literary Awards were held at TSB Hub on Wednesday 24 October with more than 70 people in attendance. Attracting a record number of entries, the awards give local authors and poets an opportunity to showcase their skills. Judges Mary-Anne Scott, Matt Rilkoff and Airini Beautrais were delighted with the high standard of entries. Hāwera’s Bruce Finer was the winner in the Open Section Short Story, while Maria Cunningham of New Plymouth placed first in the Open Section Poetry. Sasha Finer, from Hāwera High School, won both the Secondary School Short Story and Poetry categories. Maia-Laine Rupapera Maeke from St Mary’s Diocesan School was placed first in the Secondary School Research Article category.

Results:
Research Article
First Place ($500)/ I Don’t use Snapchat, But my Dad does – Maia-Laine Rupapera Maeke / St Mary’s Diocesan School
Second Place ($300)/ The Acceleration of Communication – Alex Paish / St Mary’s Diocesan School
Third Place ($200) / Farming through Technology – Monique Radford / St Mary’s Diocesan School

Short Story
Open
First place ($500)/ Heartwood – Bruce Finer / Hāwera
Second place ($300)/ Dilemna – Chris Purdon / Hāwera
Third Place ($200)/ Catch a Boy – Darly Paraha / Hāwera
Secondary School
First place ($500)/ Immortality – Sasha Finer / Hāwera High School
Second place ($300)/ The Magpie – Sasha Finer / Hāwera High School
Third Place ($200)/ Olympics – Holly Stewart / Hāwera High School

Poetry
Open
First place ($500)/ Elegy – Maria Cunningham / New Plymouth
Second place ($300) / After the Sale – Stuart Greenhill / Stratford
Third Place ($200)/ You always look younger when smiling at Parties – Michaela Stoneman / Pātea
Highly Commended / A rip in the crotch of my Jeans – Alyx Devlin / Eltham
Highly Commended / Futures Past – Michaela Stoneman / Pātea
Highly Commended / Death and Taxes – Maria Cunningham / New Plymouth
Secondary School
First place ($500)/ / Forbidden Fruits – Sasha Finer / Hāwera High School
Second place ($300)/ Long Distance Calls – Sasha Finer / Hāwera High School
Third Place ($200)/ My Normality – Lexi McQuaig / Ōpūnake High School

 

 

Nina Powles makes shortlist for inaugural Women Poets’ Prize

 

The Rebecca Swift Foundation is deeply excited to share the shortlist for the inaugural Women Poets’ Prize.  See here

Shortlist includes Nina:

Nina Mingya Powles
Nina Mingya Powles is a writer from New Zealand living in London. She is the author of Luminescent (2017) and Girls of the Drift (2014), and her poetry pamphlet Field Notes on a Downpour is forthcoming from If A Leaf Falls Press. She is Poetry Editor at the Shanghai Review, and won the 2018 Jane Martin Poetry Prize. @ninamingya

 

The Rebecca Swift Foundation is a UK registered charity set up in memory of Rebecca Swift – a much-loved editor, novelist, diarist, poet, and founder and director of The Literary Consultancy from its foundation in 1996 until her early death in April 2017.

 

Launching a year on from Rebecca’s passing, 2018 marks the inaugural Women Poets’ Prize – a biennial award seeking to honour Rebecca’s two key passions: poetry and the empowerment of women.

 

The Prize will be awarded to three female-identifying poets. Each winner will be carefully matched with a poetry mentor in addition to a pastoral coach, facilitating a holistic body of support that nurtures craft and personal wellbeing in equal measure. The Prize will also offer a programme of support and creative professional development opportunities with the Foundation’s partners: Faber and Faber, The Literary Consultancy, RADA, City Lit, Verve Festival, Bath Spa University, and The Poetry School. In addition to these opportunities which constitute the Women Poets’ Prize professional grant, each successful poet will each receive a cash bursary of £1,000.

 

 

Dunedin writer Sue Wootton is the recipient of the NZSA Peter & Dianne Beatson Fellowship 2018

Sue_Wootton-300dpiBW-546x600.jpg

 

Sue Wootton will use the fellowship to work on an historical novel. She says: ‘I’m proud and delighted to be the recipient of the 2018 Peter and Dianne Beatson Fellowship. It’s really invigorating to receive this vote of confidence in my project, and wonderful to know that I can now dedicate a sustained stretch of time to work on my second novel, which begins during the 1948 polio epidemic and explores the effects of this on one NZ family’.

Sue Wootton’s poetry, fiction and essays are widely published in New Zealand and internationally, and her work has been recognised in a number of awards and competitions, including the International Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine, the Caselberg Poetry Prize, the Gwen Harwood Poetry Prize, the University of Canberra Vice Chancellor’s Prize, the BNZ Katherine Mansfield Short Story Competition and the NZ Poetry Society International Competition. Her debut novel, Strip (Mākaro Press), was longlisted for the fiction prize in the 2017 Ockham NZ Book Awards, and her fifth poetry collection, The Yield (Otago University Press) was a finalist in the 2018 poetry category of these prestigious national awards.

Selection panel convener David Hill commented: ‘Sue Wootton is a versatile and much-admired writer, with a growing track record in both poetry and prose. Her sample of work is distinguished by writing that is both adventurous and accessible.’

 

Full details here

 

 

 

 

 

Winner of National Schools Poetry Award 2018

Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 8.59.36 AM.png

 

A Year 13 student at Wellington’s Queen Margaret College has won first place in the 2018 International Institute of Modern Letters’ (IIML) National Schools Poetry Award, with her poem ‘Vignettes’.

Ilena Shadbolt receives a prize of $500 and the opportunity to attend a poetry masterclass with poets James Brown and Hera Lindsay Bird at the IIML, home of Victoria University of Wellington’s prestigious creative writing programme. Ilena’s school library also receives a $500 book grant. Nine others were shortlisted in the awards and they will also attend the masterclass.

“I’m very excited to attend the masterclass with James Brown and Hera Lindsay Bird. I’m already a fan of Hera Lindsay Bird’s poetry and I’m really flattered and empowered to have won the award,” says Ilena.

“I wrote ‘Vignettes’ after my friend and I walked down to the dairy from my house at 9pm to get ice-cream. It was a strangely liberating walk; it felt like we were floating between all these glowing fish tanks dotted on the hills, pointing out to each other the little instances playing out in people’s living rooms and kitchens.”

Judge Louise Wallace—editor of Starling journal for young New Zealand writers and author of three collections of poetry—says the young poets who entered the competition are engaging sharply with the world around them, writing about gender, culture and identity, feminism and #metoo, our changing environment and political systems and their implications.

“Ilena Shadbolt’s subtly crafted ‘Vignettes’, is a beautiful observational poem, and as the title suggests, captures small glimpses of life. It is presented in the author’s natural voice, nothing feels forced, and as much is conveyed in what the poem doesn’t say, as in what it does. There is a nervous tension in this relationship, yet there is also a distance present between the speaker and the city—they are an outsider, looking in.”

Ilena Shadbolt will read her winning poem alongside leading Wellington poets at Unity Books Wellington, 12-1pm on Friday 24 August, to celebrate Phantom Billstickers National Poetry Day. National Schools Poetry Award founder and Victoria University Emeritus Professor, Bill Manhire, will introduce the event.

The nine shortlisted poets are: Stella Stevens, Motueka High School; Catherine Davidson, St Hilda’s Collegiate; Kushla Siemonek, Taumarunui High School; Patricia Alcartado, Hamilton Girls’ High School, Anna Doak, Cerys Fletcher, Cashmere High School; Ruby Rae Macomber, Harriet Carter, Northcote College; Cybella Maffitt, St Cuthbert’s College.

“This award has a fine history of uncovering some seriously talented young poets. The 2018 winner and the exciting new writers who are shortlisted receive a great boost from this recognition and are now perfectly placed to take their work to a new level,” IIML Director Professor Damien Wilkins says.

All shortlisted students receive an additional package of literary prizes provided by the New Zealand Book Council, Victoria University Press, Sport, Landfall, and the New Zealand Society of Authors, as well as $100. Flights and accommodation costs are covered for students outside of Wellington to attend the masterclass at the IIML.

The 2018 National Schools Poetry Award is organised by the IIML with the support of Creative New Zealand and advertising agency Ogilvy (formerly Ogilvy & Mather), with promotional support from Wonderlab.

The winning poem is attached. The judge’s report and all the shortlisted poems are available on the National Schools Poetry Award website.

New Zealander Charles Olsen awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado in Spain

Charles Olsen_photo by Lilián Pallares-14-7-2018.jpg

 

Warm congratulations from Poetry Shelf!
New Zealander Charles Olsen has been awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado, which takes the name of the Spanish writer who lived and worked in the cities of Segovia and Soria in Spain.

Organized by the town councils of Segovia and Soria the residency is open to poets resident in Europe of any nationality other than Spanish who have a basic knowledge of the Spanish language. The winner receives 3,000 euros and the town councils cover the poet’s travel costs to and from their cities.

The jury, presided over by Manuel Rico Rego and including Amalia Iglesias, María Isabel Gil, César Ibáñez and Andrés Martín has awarded the III Poetry Award SxS Antonio Machado to Charles Olsen for his proposal, which includes the first draft of a collection of between 30 and 40 poems in Spanish divided in two parts (Segovia and Soria) and a poetry project with the participation of residents of Segovia and Soria.

Charles will spend one month in each city following in the footsteps of the Spanish poet Antonio Machado, who first moved to the region of Castile in 1907 taking up the position of Professor of French at the Instituto General y Técnico of Soria, which now bears his name. He stayed until 1912, the year his young wife, Leonor Izquierdo, died and shortly after the publication of the first edition of Campos de Castilla.

2019 will be the centenary of the Antonio Machado’s arrival in Segovia where he stayed from 1919 until 1932 giving classes at the Instituto General y Técnico—now the IES Mariano Quintanilla—and actively participating in the creation and development of valuable democratic projects such as the Popular University, which will also celebrate its centenary in 2019 and has now become the San Quirce Royal Academy of History and Arts. A convinced pro-European and committed to peace and respect when both were becoming scarce in the world, Antonio Machado continues to be an important humanist and ethical figure, which only adds to the greatness of his literary oeuvre.

Charles himself has published two collections of poetry in Spain, Sr Citizen and Antípodas, and his poems are included in recent editions of Landfall, Poetry New Zealand Yearbook and Blackmail Press.

For New Zealand’s Phantom Billstickers National Poetry Day in August he will be running the competition Given Words, now in its third year, and to celebrate receiving the award he will choose words from one of Antonio Machado’s poems with which participants must weave their own poem. The Given Words competition, open to all New Zealand citizens and residents of any age, will go live on 1 August and has prizes for Best Poem and Best Poem by Under-16s, donated by Massey University Press and Mākaro Press. The winning poems will also be translated into Spanish.

 

 

 

 

Rachel McAlpine: to take up writers in residence at Yeonhui Art Space in Seoul

 

Great news for Rachel McAlpine. Full post here

From Rachel:

I am excited and honoured to have been chosen as one of the writers in residence at Yeonhui Art Space in Seoul for the month of September. Everything about this residency gives me such a buzz.

  • The programme is part of the Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture, a well organised government body
  • The buildings look charming and so does the setting
  • The thought of a whole month in which writing comes first thrills me top to toe
  • Everyone says the people of Korea are super friendly
  • I’m sure to be involved in some literary events
  • It’s in Seoul! My first visit to a legendary city! In autumn!
  • I will have time to explore the city including the famous flea markets and temples and daytime discos for old people.

 

 

 

 

 

Caselberg International Poetry Prize opens June 1st

Now Open: International Poetry Prize

 

Entries are now open for the Caselberg International Poetry Prize, judged by David Eggleton. The winning poem will be published in the Spring edition of Landfall, and the winning poet will receive a $500 Prize and a week long stay at the beautiful Caselberg House out on the Otago Peninsula.

 

Information for Entrants

The competition opens 1st June and closes on 31st July. Entries are judged blind. First Prize is $500 (plus one-week stay at the Caselberg house at Broad Bay, Dunedin). Second Prize is $250; and there are up to 5 Highly-Commended awards (no monetary prizes).

The first- and second-placed poems will be published in the Spring issue of Landfall, and all winning and highly-commended entries will appear on the Caselberg Trust web-site (copyright remaining with the authors).

Entry fee: $20 for up to four poems from any one entrant. Payment may be made to any branch of the ANZ National Bank to the credit of the Caselberg Trust, a/c no. 06-0901-0353698-00, giving your name as the payer reference; or by cheque made out to ‘Caselberg Trust’, or in cash.

Note – entry fees must be paid prior to submitting your entry, and where payments are not received, poems will not be submitted for judging

  • Poems must be the original work of the entrant, previously unpublished, and not submitted elsewhere.
  • Poems must be no more than 40 lines in length.
  • Entries must be typewritten, and each poem should be laid out on a separate page (or separate word document if attached via email) and any style or subject will be considered.
  • The poet’s name must not appear on the typescript.

Entries may be submitted by e-mail to poetry@caselbergtrust.org or post to:

Caselberg Poetry Prize
PO Box 71
Portobello
Dunedin 9014
NZ

Along with your entries, whether by e-mail or as hard copy, please provide your name and postal address and phone number, and your e-mail address (for receipt of your entry fee when this is received). If you have no e-mail address, and you want receipt of entry please send a stamped addressed envelope.

 

No entries received after 31st July 2016 will be considered.

Winners only will be notified of their success. A copy of the Judge’s report will be posted on the Caselberg Trust website , and as always, the Judge’s decisions will be final, and no correspondence will be entered into.

David Eggleton lives in Otepoti/Dunedin, where he is a poet, writer, reviewer and editor. His first collection of poems was co-winner of the PEN New Zealand Best First Book of Poems Award in 1987. In 2015 he received the Janet Frame Literary Trust Award for Poetry. His collection of poems, The Conch Trumpet, won the 2016 Ockham New Zealand Book Award for Poetry. Also in 2016, he received the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in Poetry. A new collection, Edgeland and other poems, is being published by Otago University Press in July 2018.

Click here to read about last year’s winning poem.