Rachel McAlpine: to take up writers in residence at Yeonhui Art Space in Seoul

 

Great news for Rachel McAlpine. Full post here

From Rachel:

I am excited and honoured to have been chosen as one of the writers in residence at Yeonhui Art Space in Seoul for the month of September. Everything about this residency gives me such a buzz.

  • The programme is part of the Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture, a well organised government body
  • The buildings look charming and so does the setting
  • The thought of a whole month in which writing comes first thrills me top to toe
  • Everyone says the people of Korea are super friendly
  • I’m sure to be involved in some literary events
  • It’s in Seoul! My first visit to a legendary city! In autumn!
  • I will have time to explore the city including the famous flea markets and temples and daytime discos for old people.

 

 

 

 

 

Monday Poem: Anne Kennedy’s ‘One of My Baxter Poems’

 

One of My Baxter Poems

(from Moth Hour)

 

Coming down off the spine of the Botanical Gardens

onto the green flank of the dragon, shadows arch

 

under my feet. In the dell below, the shell-shaped stage

is strewn with red Camelias. November 

 

and across the valley on the dense dark Tinakori hill

houses begin to light up like Guy Fawkes. 

 

At the top of Patanga Crescent the pared-down villa

trembles with young men thinking,

 

pens lost in the wide sleeves of their dead uncles.

They are ecstatic and do everything extravagantly

 

in the last light: read, drink, fuck.

On the windowsill – a stone, leaf, a twig with buds,

 

and the black cat left behind mewling by the old lady

now in the Home of Compassion. No change.

 

©Anne Kennedy

 

Anne Kennedy’s new novel The Ice Shelf is due from VUP in October. She teaches writing at Manukau Institute of Technology. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Better Off Read: Pip Adam in conversation with Helen Heath

 

 

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Wonderful conversation, wonderful book, plus the joys of reading Fleur Adcock.

‘This episode I caught up with poet, essayist and teacher Helen Heath. Helen recently published an astounding collection of poetry which poses the question Are Friends Electric? We got together to talk about Fleur Adcock’s poem ‘Gas’, first published in her 1971 collection High Tide in the Garden and it’s also available in Fleur Adcock Poems 1960-2000, and Helen’s exciting new book.’

Listen here

 

 

 

 

Poetry Shelf audio spot: Emma Shi reads ‘What comes after’

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‘.

 

Emma Shi was the winner of the National Schools Poetry NZ 2013 and the Poetry NZ Prize 2017. She has also been published in literary journals such as Landfall and Starling. She writes at facebook.com/emmlexx.

 

You can read the poem at The Starling where it was first published.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Time to enter National Schools Poetry Award

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And the judge is Louise Wallace.

Louise Wallace‘s poems have been published in literary journals in New Zealand, Australia and the U.S., translated into German and Spanish, and anthologised in Best of Best New Zealand Poems, Essential New Zealand Poems: Facing the Empty Page, and Manifesto Aotearoa: 101 Political Poems. In 2015 she was the Robert Burns Fellow at the University of Otago, Dunedin. In 2016 she represented New Zealand at the Mexico City Poetry Festival. She is the author of three collections of poetry, all published by Victoria University Press, the most recent being Bad Things (2017). She is the founder and editor of Starling, an online journal publishing the work of young New Zealand writers

James Brown and Hera Lindsay Bird are this year’s masterclass convenors.

Details here

 

 

 

 

At E-Tangata – Michalia Arathimos on our gated writing literary community and her new book

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full piece here

 

In the story of the Trojan Horse, after a ten-year siege, the Greeks pretend to sail away and leave a “gift” of a wooden horse on the doorstep of the city of Troy. The Trojans pull the horse into their city. But, under the cover of night, a select force of men creep out of it, torching the city, and thus winning the war for the Greeks.

I am a Greek-New Zealand writer and I am building a horse like this — or, more accurately, I’m allowing it to build itself.

But, in this story, the Trojan Horse is a non-fiction book that I’m writing about the media in Aotearoa — and the warriors are writers. Māori writers, Pasifika writers, French and Chinese and “other” writers. Any writers that haven’t been identified by the press as part of a Pākehā mainstream.

And the city of Troy is Pākehā culture, which I envisage in this book as a walled fortress. In front of this fortress, the horse is taking shape. There are voices clamouring inside it, about to be let out.

The voices belong to some of Aotearoa’s foremost writers: Tusiata Avia, Tina Makereti, Chris Tse, Paula Morris, and Karlo Mila, among many others, who I’ve interviewed for my upcoming book, The Outliers: Who do we want to be?